https://www.mcall.com/news/breaking/mc-nws-berks-child-deaths-arrest-20191202-n3awtpbfgjaqtoh3lk4pyqlcjy-story.

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This site above does an AMAZING JOB giving all the details of the arrest and investigation findings.

Authorities say the mother of two Berks County children found hanged in the basement of their home in September is being charged with their killings and conducted several internet searches about murder methods.

Lisa Rachelle Snyder, 36, was charged Monday in the homicides of her children, 8-year-old Conner and 4-year-old Brinley. The charges include first-degree murder, third-degree murder, tampering with evidence, endangering the welfare of children, animal cruelty and sexual intercourse with a dog. According to court records, Snyder is being held in Berks County Jail without bail.

A news conference is planned for 2 p.m. at the Berks County Courthouse.

The deaths of Conner and Brinley were investigated by the Lehigh County Coroner’s office. In a news release issued Monday after Lisa Snyder’s arrests, coroner Eric Minnich said both children died from hanging and their deaths were ruled homicides. He declined to comment on any additional testing completed, citing the ongoing investigation.

According to court records detailing Snyder’s arrest:

Authorities say one day before the children were found hanged in the basement, Snyder Googled “hanging yourself” and visited a website detailing an effective way of hanging a person. Snyder also searched for “how long to die” from carbon monoxide and several searches for “almost got away with it,” a reference to a true crime television series on Investigation Discovery.

Snyder was interviewed by police on two occasions. She told police that Conner had been bullied because of his weight and had “lost 25 pounds since school started because he was starving himself.”

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”

Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

Authorities say one day before the children were found hanged in the basement, Snyder Googled “hanging yourself” and visited a website detailing an effective way of hanging a person. Snyder also searched for “how long to die” from carbon monoxide and several searches for “almost got away with it,” a reference to a true crime television series on Investigation Discovery.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”

Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

Authorities say one day before the children were found hanged in the basement, Snyder Googled “hanging yourself” and visited a website detailing an effective way of hanging a person. Snyder also searched for “how long to die” from carbon monoxide and several searches for “almost got away with it,” a reference to a true crime television series on Investigation Discovery.
Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”Authorities say one day before the children were found hanged in the basement, Snyder Googled “hanging yourself” and visited a website detailing an effective way of hanging a person. Snyder also searched for “how long to die” from carbon monoxide and several searches for “almost got away with it,” a reference to a true crime television series on Investigation Discovery.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”Authorities say one day before the children were found hanged in the basement, Snyder Googled “hanging yourself” and visited a website detailing an effective way of hanging a person. Snyder also searched for “how long to die” from carbon monoxide and several searches for “almost got away with it,” a reference to a true crime television series on Investigation Discovery.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”Authorities say one day before the children were found hanged in the basement, Snyder Googled “hanging yourself” and visited a website detailing an effective way of hanging a person. Snyder also searched for “how long to die” from carbon monoxide and several searches for “almost got away with it,” a reference to a true crime television series on Investigation Discovery.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”

Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

Authorities say one day before the children were found hanged in the basement, Snyder Googled “hanging yourself” and visited a website detailing an effective way of hanging a person. Snyder also searched for “how long to die” from carbon monoxide and several searches for “almost got away with it,” a reference to a true crime television series on Investigation Discovery.

Snyder was interviewed by police on two occasions. She told police that Conner had been bullied because of his weight and had “lost 25 pounds since school started because he was starving himself.”

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”

Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”
Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”
Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”
Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”
Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”
Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”
Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”
Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder also told investigators that her son suffered from a speech delay is “a little slower to grasp things and kids make fun of him because he was fat.” She said when she talked to Conner about his problems, he allegedly told her that “I woulda killed myself already, but I am scared to go myself.”
Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder said the day her children died, Conner came home from school and asked her if he could go “downstairs to build a fort.” She said Conner asked if he could use a dog lead on the table that she had just bought that day and she said yes. Snyder said as Conner went up and down the stairs, taking dining room chairs with him, she was putting laundry away and went outside for a cigarette.Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.

Snyder told police after about 10 minutes outside, she went back to ask the children what they wanted for dinner and that’s when she found them hanging. Snyder said she tried to lift her daughter, who weighs about 40 pounds, but she told police when her “anxiety spikes,” she starts to sweat profusely and was unable to remove the dog lead. Snyder also told police she tried to lift her son, who weighs about 150 pounds, but was unable to.

A person only referred to as “witness 3” who lived at the Snyder home told police that it was not normal for Conner and Brinley to play in the basement and they would often play in the living room. That witness also told police the Conner never mentioned being bullied. Several other unnamed family members also told police that Conner “never expressed he was bullied or suicidal.”

Snyder told police Conner was being bullied while riding the bus to school, but investigators said a review of bus security cameras showed Conner with “no signs of distress.”

On Sept. 27 and Nov. 7, police interviewed an unnamed witness who works as a certified occupational therapist who had worked with Conner while at school. That person, only referred to as “Witness 2,” said Conner received occupational therapy due to his “below average visual motor skills” and had “difficulty with dexterity, using his index finger and thumb pinched together.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

Police showed the occupational therapist a replica of the dog lead and the therapist said Conner would have had “difficulty operating the clasp due his poor dexterity.” The therapist also told police that the way the lead was wrapped around the basement beam was “too equal in length” and Conner would have had difficulty doing that. “Conner would have had a difficult time finding the middle,” and that he often was “clumsy and would bump into things.”

According to the affidavit, in the weeks leading up to the killings, Snyder sent at least three sexually explicit photos of herself engaged in sexual acts with a black and white dog to an unnamed person.

Snyder’s family members could not be reached for comment Monday. According to court records, Snyder is being represented by attorney Dennis Charles, who could not immediately be reached for comment.